KDMC taking Danish control of DirectOut

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directoutKDMC

KDMC will act as a Danish distributor for German manufacturer DirectOut Technologies, moving forward.

KDMC owner Kim Johansen has been involved in large A/V and broadcast projects as product manager and system designer for the past 10 years. For 28 years, he has also worked as a FOH engineer for various bands and projects.

DirectOut CEO and sales manager Jan Ehrlich says: “Kim Johansen has already worked with us for more than six years, from when he was with Soundware. During that time, Kim was very committed to our brand and products.

“As an extremely experienced and professional working audio engineer, he is highly respected by the industry and his clients. Doing business with Kim means that we can be confident that the client is covered perfectly in a qualified way.”

Kim Johansen adds: “I am very happy to be able to work with DirectOut again. The products are a perfect match for my costumers, who expect equipment at the highest quality and reliability. This, combined with the growing number of products you cannot live without, makes DirectOut a valuable piece in almost any audio puzzle, from broadcast to live sound.”

www.directout.eu

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