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Recording studio part of Olympic Cinema’s plans - PSNEurope

Recording studio part of Olympic Cinema’s plans

The Olympic Cinema site in Barnes will include a fully operational recording studio which is due to open in Autumn 2011, writes Paul Watson
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The Olympic Cinema is the new name for 117-123 Church Road in Barnes, London - former home of Olympic Sound Studios, which played host to The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, The Who, Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin during the 60s and 70s, before closing its doors in November 2008. The building was purchased in March 2010 by a local Barnes couple, both of whom have a history of working in the film industry and want to look after the landmark building, ensuring it’s referenced in an appropriate way. A cinema is perhaps an obvious choice for two film-lovers, but the private owners also have a recording studio within their plans, to retain some of the building’s unique history as Olympic Sound Studios. “We’ve got quite a lot of space to use, so we’re all fiddling about with plans at the moment,” explains project manager Hannah Rothman. “But there are lots of ideas for the recording studio; and we’re talking to people who know the business, so we can get it right.” The Olympic Cinema is looking to raise two-hundred-and-fifty ‘founding members’ contributions in £5k chunks, targeting investors that want to make a contribution to their community rather than financial gain. Benefits will include lifetime membership of the cinema and members’club; pre-release screenings and special events; access to the library and games room; a third off of all standard tickets; and to top it off, your name will appear on the Founders Members’ Hall of Fame in a prominent location! 
“We’re looking at this as a whole thing,” says Rothman. “Each of the various different elements will operate under the Olympic banner.” www.olympiccinema.co.uk

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