Tinnitus Awareness Week to be launched with Cargo party

UK: Tinnitus-suffering artists including Adam F, Jagz Kooner (pictured) and Eddy Temple-Morris are set to appear, reports David Davies. The free event hosted by the British Tinnitus Association (BTA) and Eddy Temple-Morris - the charity's newly appointed ambassador - will take place at Cargo in Shoreditch, London, between 8pm and 12am on February 8.
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UK: Tinnitus-suffering artists including Adam F, Jagz Kooner (pictured) and Eddy Temple-Morris are set to appear, reports David Davies. The free event hosted by the British Tinnitus Association (BTA) and Eddy Temple-Morris - the charity's newly appointed ambassador - will take place at Cargo in Shoreditch, London, between 8pm and 12am on February 8.

Devised to launch the start of Tinnitus Awareness Week 2010, the Cargo event will feature numerous high-profile DJs, each of which will pick and play one record to generate "one of the largest DJ mash-ups of recent times". The result will be given away as a free download to all guests who sign up for the BTA mailing list.

The night will also see a live performance from electro-punk group Burn The Negative and a full DJ set from Temple-Morris.

"I'm fortunate that I've managed to survive fairly well considering the intense noise levels of some of the bands I've worked with," Jagz Kooner tells PSN-e. "However, I've lived by the saying 'if it sounds good at low volume levels then it will be fine loud'. The truth is you can't always do that and to have some form of ear plugs (or even a tissue you can tear up and place over the outer ear) is an absolute must. It's a lesson I learned too late.

"If you are in any way, shape or form involved in music, then your ears are the most important instruments. Can you really afford not to protect them from the damage and abuse they sustain over the years?"

Although the event is free to attend, donations to the BTA will be welcomed upon entry. The Association will give advice and support throughout the event, and provide personal hearing protection to all attendees.

"I'm delighted to be helping the BTA to raise awareness of tinnitus," said Temple-Morris. "It's a condition that I've experienced for several years and one that affects the majority of my friends and colleagues in the music industry as a result of exposure to loud music."

Web
» www.tinnitus.org.uk

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