MIPRO ACT finds favour with UK dance group - PSNEurope

MIPRO ACT finds favour with UK dance group

UK: Chicane's sound engineer, Tim Peeling, has been using MIPRO's ACT digital wireless radio system, reports David Davies. Peeling discovered the system through UK hire company Concert Sound, and first employed it for shows in the UK and Romania earlier this year.
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UK: Chicane's sound engineer, Tim Peeling, has been using MIPRO's ACT digital wireless radio system, reports David Davies. Peeling discovered the system through UK hire company Concert Sound, and first employed it for shows in the UK and Romania earlier this year.

Chicane vocalist Tash Andrews' "very breathy" vocals provided a particular test for the system.

"She was on ears and was very happy very quickly," noted Peeling. "Also tonally: is she comfortable with what's coming back in? She was, which was good as it can often be a bit of a struggle with the artist. What works for a FOH engineer doesn't necessarily always work for an artist at the same time in the same way. Handling noise was very low and the feedback rejection was excellent."

Peeling went on to praise the system's design and battery life, and highlighted the receiver's option of either analogue or digital output to interface with any mixing console.

"We're really interested in trying the digital out because probably 70% of the time the musical issues are on stage so it makes sense to use as few A/Ds and D/As as possible," he said. "It's nice to have the ability to program everything on the receiver's front panel and then just sync the transmitter with it."

MIPRO ACT is available through Fuzion plc, whose communications manager, Josie Barker, tells PSN-e: "MIPRO's ACT-82 digital system has been well-received by users across the industry, with several systems already implemented and more out on demo. With the forthcoming frequency spectrum change users are becoming more astute when purchasing; the ACT-82 has been specifically designed to accommodate these changes, making it an increasingly popular choice."

Web » www.fuzion.co.uk

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