New Orban loudness/level metering software

Orban/CRL's parent company, Circuit Research Labs, has made the first public beta of Orban Loudness Meter available as a free download. Accessible at the Orban website, the new software is suitable for use with Windows XP and Vista operating systems, writes David Davies.
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Orban/CRL's parent company, Circuit Research Labs, has made the first public beta of Orban Loudness Meter available as a free download. Accessible at the Orban website, the new software is suitable for use with Windows XP and Vista operating systems, writes David Davies.

The current free software simultaneously displays instantaneous peaks, VU, PPM, CBS Technology Centre loudness, and ITU BS.1770 loudness. All meters include peak-hold functionality that, says Orban/CRL, makes the peak indications of the meters easy to see.

The software accepts two-channel stereo inputs. The VU and PPM meters are split to indicate the left and right channels, while the PPM meter also displays the instantaneous peak values of the L and R digital samples.

Future paid versions of the software will offer upgraded features including logging, surround monitoring and oversampled peak measurements that accurately indicate the peak level of the audio after D-A conversion.

Orban's chief engineer, Bob Orban, tells PSN-e that "future paid versions of the meter will include surround loudness measurement (up to 7.1 channels), interchannel phasing, vector display mode, the ability to write meter data to logging files, histograms, and oversampling to make the PPM more accurate, with peaks less than 2ms in duration. In the spirit of the BS.1770 standard, we also expect to oversample the absolute peak meter to allow it to predict D-A and sample rate converter clipping. Additionally, we expect to allow the user to select the scales of the meters so that the PPM, in particular, can be scaled according to the user's preferred standard."

Web » www.orban.com/meter

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