Balloon Records selects SSL Matrix - PSNEurope

Balloon Records selects SSL Matrix

“SSL’s Matrix is the first console we’ve found that’s suitable as the centrepiece of the studio and that could handle all of the line level sources,” said Balloon Records MD Thomas Jelinek.
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Leading European dance music label Balloon Records has equipped its bespoke studio with a Solid State Logic Matrix system. The growing size and scale of the studio had given rise to a number of routing issues, leading to a review of the technical set-up and the purchase of a Matrix system with additional interfacing provided by two SSL MadiXtreme 128s and four Xlogic Alpha-Links – as a result of which the studio now offers 192 inputs and outputs.

These are mixed down to 40 channels using the controller side of the Matrix, resulting – said Balloon Records MD Thomas Jelinek – in “a level of comfort and automation possibilities that we never thought possible. Matrix is so small, yet so powerful. Our old set-up was so large that it was hard to find the sweet spot when mixing. With Matrix, we can now use the controller to scroll through a 190 channel project without moving our heads more than 20cm, which is great!”

Jelinek also highlighted the benefits the Matrix has brought for workflow and the system’s sound quality: “It all sounds so clear...it’s amazing! Now I can focus on the detail and finish much quicker.”

www.solidstatelogic.com

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