Veale Associates completes multi-studio education project

Veale Associates and Preco recently completed work on a major project involving two new radio recording studios and a creative sound facility at Middlesex University.
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Studio design company Veale Associates has completed and handed over two new radio recording studios and a creative sound facility to the Art, Design & Media School at Middlesex University.

The installation - which was executed in conjunction with Preco - is part of a large fit-out at the university’s newly developed Art Design and Media building.

Preco director of engineering & technology James Thomas remarked that “a key objective was to match both the technical resources and ambience of a modern radio presentation and recording studio”.

Accordingly, each of the two radio recording rooms is approximately 12 square metres in area and visually coupled to the other by a fully soundproofed window. The studios have matching acoustics, interior design and technical furniture, and complement the style used for programme presentation and one-to-one interviews.

In each studio, an L-shaped desk features a Logitek digital audio mixing console consisting of a 10-fader Mosaic control surface, monitor control module and meter bridge. These are connected to a Logitek AE-32 time-division-multiplexing audio processor. Preco also equipped the training rooms with OMT iMedia Touch on-air automation plus iMedia Production and Log Tools software, including PC, sound cards and touch screens. The iMedia Touch is linked to a Tascam DV-RA1000HD audio recorder with a 60 gigabyte internal hard disk drive and CD/DVD burner.

Each of the two studios also has three Audio Technica AT4033aSM cardioid condenser microphones mounted on adjustable Yellowtec Mika arms. An equipment pod under each desk houses Sonifex Redbox audio processors, plus the Logitek Mosaic main and auxiliary power supplies. The desks themselves were constructed to Preco custom design. The monitor loudspeakers are ceiling-suspended Tannoy Reveal 601as.

“This has been a huge project overall, and the implementation of this part of it has been an example for all to follow,” said the university’s capital projects manager, Ian Bartholomew. “We have been hugely impressed with the expertise of Veale Associates and partner company Preco, who have delivered a first class installation incorporating many features that the students will encounter when they move on to real world working. I know that the students will be knocked out when they get their hands on the new facilities and start using them over the next few weeks.”

Veale Associates’ head consultant, Eddie Veale, said: “All acoustic projects are different, and this one presented the particular challenge of designing a set of studios to a tight budget, and within that constraint provide facilities which would give the students the same working environment that they would experience in real world studios later in their careers – even down to the same faders. I am proud that we achieved that, and the University is very pleased with the results.”

www.preco.co.uk
www.vealea.com

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