Shure scores new anti-counterfeiting victory

CHINA: Two large quantities of counterfeit Shure E2c and E4c earphones have been seized in Shanghai, reports David Davies. Following an investigation initiated by Shure, officials of the Baoshan Office of the Shanghai Administration for Industry and Commerce (AIC) conducted raids on wholesale stores and warehouses belonging to Han Si Appliance Co and Run Zheng Digital Ltd, both located in the Zhabei District of Shanghai.
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CHINA: Two large quantities of counterfeit Shure E2c and E4c earphones have been seized in Shanghai, reports David Davies. Following an investigation initiated by Shure, officials of the Baoshan Office of the Shanghai Administration for Industry and Commerce (AIC) conducted raids on wholesale stores and warehouses belonging to Han Si Appliance Co and Run Zheng Digital Ltd, both located in the Zhabei District of Shanghai.

The two raids have been officially reported and published on the Shanghai AIC's public website. The penalties to be imposed by the administrative body are still to be determined.

In addition to anti-counterfeiting actions in China, Shure says that it is also continuing "forceful efforts" against intellectual property violation in other parts of Asia, Europe, South America, the Middle East, Africa and the US.

Sandy LaMantia, president and CEO of Shure, commented: "The Shure brand carries with it a promise of quality and performance. Counterfeit Shure products do not live up to that promise, and that damages the value of our brand. We are fiercely committed to working with international agencies and other brands to fight the spread of counterfeit products and halt this kind of criminal activity."

Expanding upon the problem of faked goods to PSN-e, Shure executive vice-president and general counsel Paul Applebaum (pictured) notes that "counterfeiting has proliferated in recent years because modern technology makes it easier to make counterfeits and the Internet makes the marketing and sale of counterfeit products much easier. However, much of the selling appears to be on a relatively small scale, and almost all of the counterfeits originate from China."

While Applebaum says that the problem "seems to be intensifying with an increasingly globalised world economy", he believes that there is some reason for optimism in the long-term. "As economies such as China's develop rapidly, their own domestic industries develop regional and global brand names with reputations worth protecting," he says. "As companies in these developing economies increasingly seek to protect their own brands and the intellectual property that goes into their products, they will increasingly demand the rule of law in their own home countries. Their governments will be under greater pressure to enforce the law more strictly against counterfeiters, and counterfeiting will no longer be widely tolerated in these places."

For a full feature on the counterfeiting problem and the measures being taken by pro-audio manufacturers to combat it, see the June issue of Pro Sound News Europe.

www.shure.com

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