Save Our Sound UK campaign gathers pace - PSNEurope

Save Our Sound UK campaign gathers pace

UK: In the wake of a call to action from Harvey Goldsmith (pictured), Baroness McIntosh highlighted the PMSE funding issue during a speech in the House of Lords. In further confirmation that the Save Our Sound UK campaign is gaining pace, the debate surrounding PMSE funding post-spectrum reallocation has been aired in the letters page of The Times newspaper.
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UK: In the wake of a call to action from Harvey Goldsmith (pictured), Baroness McIntosh highlighted the PMSE funding issue during a speech in the House of Lords. In further confirmation that the Save Our Sound UK campaign is gaining pace, the debate surrounding PMSE funding post-spectrum reallocation has been aired in the letters page of The Times newspaper.

As covered on a previous edition of PSN-e, Save Our Sound UK constitutes a new focal point for the UK PMSE (programming-making and special events) sector campaign for adequate funding to cover the costs associated with forced spectrum migration.

"The campaign must ensure that people get what they deserve in compensation as a result of this enforced eviction," campaign spokesperson John Steven told PSN-e recently. "It's important that the campaign gets to as many people across the entertainment industry as possible, so that they understand how this will affect them."

In a late November speech, Baroness McIntosh - whose extensive arts experience has included senior roles with the RSC and Royal Opera House - highlighted the "current plight" of the UK PMSE sector, noting that as a result of the forthcoming spectrum sell-off, "the vast majority of the industry's stock of radio mics will become unusable". Perturbed by the "enormous cost" faced by PMSE users in replacing their obsolete equipment, McIntosh sought assurance that the UK government would "act promptly to mitigate the damaging consequences of Ofcom's interpretation of its current duties under the Communications Act by providing compensation to all those affected, not just to some."

Save Our Sound UK has also received additional encouragement in the form of support from the National Operatic and Dramatic Association (NODA) and indie-pop group The Hoosiers. Campaign organisers are urging other high-profile acts to show their support and send a message and accompanying image to saveoursound@me.com for use on the website.

The increasingly public nature of the PMSE spectrum debate can also be ascertained by a recent exchange of letters in The Times between National Campaign for the Arts director Louise de Winter and Ofcom Spectrum Policy Group director of operations Matthew Conway (links below).

Web
» www.saveoursounduk.com
» www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/letters/article6927460.ece
» www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/letters/article6922074.ece

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