Wireless plays part in dramatic Super Bowl - PSNEurope

Wireless plays part in dramatic Super Bowl

Super Bowl XLVII took place in New Orleans on Sunday (3 February) and underdogs the Baltimore Ravens' victory over the San Francisco 49ers was broadcast round the world.
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Super Bowl XLVII took place in New Orleans on Sunday (3 February) and underdogs the Baltimore Ravens' victory over the San Francisco 49ers was broadcast round the world. A key part of the audio production was the wireless microphone system installed for the referee mic and performances that framed the big game. CBS Sports was in charge of the host broadcast, with OB facilities provided by NEP. Frequency coordination and RF management was handled by Professional Wireless Systems (PWS), which has now worked on 17 consecutive Super Bowls. PWS specified Shure Axient and UHF-R wireless microphone systems and PSM-1000 series in-ear monitors (IEMs), plus 3732 receivers, 52000 transmitters and a range of Sennheiser radio equipment. The PWS Domed Helical Antenna was used on the pitch to give multichannel microphone, IEM and intercom connectivity. Even more than the surprise last gasp win for the Ravens, this year's Super Bowl was notable for Beyoncé and the other members of Destiny's Child reuniting for the half-time show and students from Sandy Hook Elementary School, scene of last December's shooting, joining singer Jennifer Hudson to perform America the Beautiful in the build-up to the game. Extra drama, if it were needed, came from a 35-minute power cut just as the second half was getting started. Commenting on the production, PWS's project manager, Jason Eskew, said, "When faced with the clutter of several hundred frequencies in use, it is our job to stay on top of it and be ready with backup frequencies and equipment. This year's Super Bowl was bigger than ever and the PWS crew made sure that the pre-game festivities, including the National Anthem, America the Beautiful and the incredible half-time show featuring Beyoncé, went off without any fumbles, even with the power outage. Thanks to our uninterruptible power supply, we were able to maintain power for the referee mics, which was still important at that time even though play was halted, until the rest of the power was restored within the Superdome." www.professionalwireless.com

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