Pro and consumer audio collide at CES

Professional and domestic audio have been coming ever closer in recent years and this was demonstrated at the recent CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas, where Fraunhofer, Dolby and DTS announced new products and collaborations with home entertainment manufacturers, writes Kevin Hilton.
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Professional and domestic audio have been coming ever closer in recent years and this was demonstrated at the recent CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas, where Fraunhofer, Dolby and DTS announced new products and collaborations with home entertainment manufacturers, writes Kevin Hilton. German research institute Fraunhofer IIS, Panasonic Automotive Systems Company of America and personal music service AUOEP! have collaborated to create a surround radio system for in-car listening. The service is based on Fraunhofer's MPEG Surround codec, which helps stream multi-channel sound over 3G/4G or WiFi networks. Fraunhofer has also joined forces with plug-ins designer Sonnox to produce a codec plug-in providing "mastering quality audio" for aspiring musicians to use with recording software including GarageBand and Sonar. Dolby Laboratories highlighted its Digital Plus surround processing system, which has been adopted by US TV network HBO for its Go streaming service, which delivers programmes to connected TVs and Blu-ray (BD) players. Samsung is also to use Dolby Digital Plus for the Acetrax application on Smart BD machines and Smart BD home cinema systems in Europe. The announcements illustrate Dolby's continuing policy to provide "immersive content anywhere, any time, on any device" (pictured). DTS introduced its 5.1 Producer encoding technology, which is being marketed as the first consumer-level, multi-channel sound-track creation tool. The company also announced that CyberLink, a specialist in multimedia for PCs and other consumer electronics equipment, is integrating DTS 5.1 Producer into its PowerDirector 10 video editing package. Another announcement from DTS concerned the first surround radio broadcast for Chiefs Radio Network based in Kansas. All home and away games of NFL team the Kansas City Chiefs are now transmitted using DTS Neural Surround to deliver an "immersive experience" for fans. www.cesweb.org

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