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Car show sees digital radio drive

The importance of both Germany and the in-car market to the growth of digital radio was outlined at this week's AMICOM automotive entertainment and communication exhibition, writes Kevin Hilton.

The importance of both Germany and the in-car market to the growth of digital radio was outlined at this week’s AMICOM automotive entertainment and communication exhibition, writes Kevin Hilton. German DAB+ services were launched last August, with original equipment manufacture (OEM) companies in the country making a public pledge to help in the shift from analogue to digital radio. The focus for where both DAB and DAB+ might be going continues to be on Germany, with the AMI (Auto Mobil International) and AMICOM (Auto Mobil International Communications) trade shows in Leipzig giving a forum for the latest products and advances in the in-car radio sector. International digital radio organisation WorldDMB and its German Project Office held a session on the technologies available during the shows (pictured), looking at the current situation in Germany and new traffic and travel services. Speaking for WorldDMB, Nick Piggott said, “What happens in Germany will shape the development of digital radio in the rest of Europe. The successes of what has already been achieved and in particular the close collaboration between broadcasters and the automotive industry is very positive.” The session was attended by nearly 100 delegates from public and private broadcasters, consumer electronics manufacturers, regulators and representatives from the car industry. A major part of future development will be the implementation of the TPEG (Transport Protocols Experts Group)-based Digital Mobility Service, which is seen as superior to the RDS (radio data system) technology used for FM radio. Dr Christhard Gelau of the Federal Ministry of Transport commented that TPEG traffic information was the only way digital radio broadcasters would be able to meet the European Directive backed by the ITS to provide freely available “safety relevant traffic information”. www.worlddab.org

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