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Sound Devices launches 664 Production Mixer at IBC2012

Erica Basnicki 7 September 2012
Sound Devices launches 664 Production Mixer at IBC2012

Sound Devices has unveiled the newest addition to its line of field and production mixers at IBC 2012; the 664 Production Mixer. The 664 builds on the features of the 552 Production Mixer, with expanded input/output connectivity and recording capabilities. Its six input channels have dedicated controls for trim, fader, pan and PFL. The inputs and four output buses are all recordable, for a total of 10 tracks of recording.   Sound Devices’ 664 contains six ultra-low noise, high-dynamic range transformer-less preamps that accept mic- or line-level signals and include analog peak limiters, high-pass filters, input trim control and direct outputs on every channel. Inputs 1 and 6 can be selected as AES3 or AES42 inputs for digital microphones, each with its own SRC for simplicity in system clocking.   The analog output compliment includes four output buses. The L and R buses are on balanced XLR, 10-Pin, TA-3M connectors, or unbalanced on TA-3M or 3.5mm connectors. Auxiliary output buses X1 and X2 are available on balanced TA-3M connectors. Inputs and buses can be routed to four AES3 connections for eight digital outputs on the XLR and 10-pin connectors.   The 664 can record up to 10 tracks, 16- or 24-bit broadcast WAV files to SD and/or CompactFlash cards. All six inputs and its four outputs are individually selectable for recording, enabling the mixer to record all 10 channels of audio. With its dual card slots, content can be recorded to either or both cards simultaneously, with the added ability to assign individual tracks to each memory card.   “Our customers are looking for more inputs, connectivity, flexibility and power in the field,” said Jon Tatooles, managing director, Sound Devices. “We have taken the strengths and knowledge gained from our existing mixer line and continue to evolve the technology to meet the growing needs of sound mixers. The 664 is how we see the future of high-performance field mixers; they need to have recording capabilities in order to be a fully functional tool in the field.”    www.sounddevices.com              

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