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Fifty issues young: a look back at PSN-e’s first half-century

test 13 November 2007

EUROPE: The recent acquisition by Klark Teknik of Sony’s AES-50 technology. Waves’ decision to pursue unauthorised users of its software. Just two of the stories broken by PSN-e over the last 17 months, writes David Davies.

Bringing six or seven piping-hot news stories to your desktop every Tuesday, PSN-e has also served to generate a significant increase in traffic to the Pro Sound News Europe website. The latest statistics reveal that the number of unique visitors to the PSNE website has increased by 230% (October 07 compared with January 07) since the newsletter was introduced, with the site reporting 53,000 unique visitors. Even more encouragingly, the number of page hits has risen by almost 250%.

“The newsletters go to a very strong database with minimal returns and an open rate of between 32% and 35%, showing how strong the interest is in the content and that is a valued email,” says Tim Frost, digital content manager (Ent Tech) at PSNE publisher CMPi.

Of course, PSN-e’s progress has hardly been hindered by the fact that 2007 has been rich in major news stories – be it takeover attempts, surprise acquisitions or major new product launches, there has rarely been a shortage of exciting developments to report. Several issues of vital importance to the industry’s future – including the threat to PMSE use of the proposed frequency spectrum auction, and the rise in illegal counterfeiting – have been the subject of frequent updates, while PSN-e has also helped to break a number of major stories, notably the unprecedented move by Waves to pursue unauthorised users of its software, and the acquisition by Klark Teknik of Sony Oxford’s SuperMAC AES50/HyperMAC networking business (a deal confirmed by John Oakley (pictured), the MD of KT’s parent company, Telex Communications (UK)).

In the grand scheme of things, however, we’re really only getting started, so please stay tuned as PSN-e goes for the full century.

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